Video Editing Mistakes Number 1

One of the most infuriating errors when video editing…

Video Editing Mistakes

Imagine. You have spent a full day filming an event with 4 cameras and then spent:

  • check
    Hours offloading and organising all the clips
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    Many hours lining up the clips from 3 or 4 cameras
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    Another couple of days carefully editing the whole lot
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    Hours researching and adding music

Then you get to that ​point where you are ready to render out for production of the clients' DVD.

For some longer jobs, this render can take up to or over 5 hours depending on your computers power. So, I tend to(if possible) render it overnight so the computer can use all its resources on this rather having me "fannying about" in the background doing other things.

Beware the rogue clip!

So, imagine my horror this morning. I am already on a tight deadline to get this job out to a client today, Bank Holiday Monday, and I play the rendered clip.

I can’t understand why it:

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    Has taken so long to render for just a 30 minute video
  • 2
    Is nearly an hour long instead of 30 minutes

This is why…

Video Editing Mistakes

If you have a rogue (stray) clip far along your timeline (from previously clipping and cropping edits), beware. If you either forget it is there or forget to "render loop region only", then your editing suite will assume that this is part of the final edit. After all, why wouldn't it?

This means you will end up with the first 30 minute clip rendering perfectly. Then (like me) around another 30 minutes of blackness playing until it reaches that rogue clip and finishes with that.

Arrrghh!

Now the clip has to be re-rendered but here is a handy tip that may help to speed up that process.

Rather than render out from the original edit, take the rendered video (with rogue clip) and pull that into a new project. Cut the rogue clip out (or simply loop the section you want to produce) and render that instead.

This can be around 3 or 4 times quicker than rendering from the original edit. I am not sure if you lose any quality doing this but in my case, I am rendering to 1080p but outputting to DVD. This way it should be ok and delivered on time!

Software used in this article (my favourite): Sony Vegas Pro

About the author

Nick

Professional photographer and videographer for more than 30 years and all round photography, video and gadget geek. Shooting ground and aerial wedding, stock and commercial photography (and video) in the UK and Europe.Please note: As an Amazon Associate and affiliate for other companies, I earn from qualifying purchases from some links used in this website. You don't pay any more but the commissions earned means I can keep adding to the website and offer free training etc. I.e. they pay my costs. Thank you.


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